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APA, MLA, Chicago/Turbian, AMA - Citation Styles: Get Started

This resource guide was designed to provide you with assistance in citing your sources when writing an academic paper.There are different styles which format the information differently.


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Welcome!

This research guide was designed to provide you with assistance in citing your sources when writing an academic paper.

There are different styles which format the information differently. In each tab, you will find descriptions of each citation style featured in this guide along with links to online resources for citing and a few examples.

What is a Citation and a Citation Style?

A citation is a way of giving credit to individuals for their creative and intellectual works that you utilized to support your research. It can also be used to locate particular sources and combat plagiarism. Typically, a citation can include the author's name, date, location of the publishing company, journal title, or DOI (Digital Object Identifer).

Citing your sources is crucial in your academic career. Please see the Shenandoah University's Academic Integrity Policies page for in-depth information.

A citation style dictates the information necessary for a citation and how the information is ordered, as well as punctuation and other formatting.

How do I Choose a Citation Style?

There are many different ways of citing resources from your research. The citation style sometimes depends on the academic discipline involved. For example:

  • APA (American Psychological Association) is used by Education, Psychology, and Sciences
  • MLA (Modern Language Association) style is used by the Humanities
  • Chicago/Turabian style is generally used by Business, History, and the Fine Arts

NOTE: Please consult with your professor to determine what style is required in your specific course.

This guide includes content adapted with permission from the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh.

 

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